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Courses

Music

Advanced Improvisation for Dancers and Musicians

This course is for advanced dancers and musicians who are serious about the performance of improvisation. We will engage in an ensemble practice, exploring specific forms generated by Professors Graves and Sgorbati as well as students. Investigations of rhythmic structures and pattern recognition will be a weekly practice. Dancers and musicians will learn how to build collaborative material together. The history of improvisation work both within the United States and globally will be discussed. Prerequisites: Previous work in dance and/or music improvisation. Corequisites: DAN4795 Advanced Projects in Dance for the dancers.

  • Milford Graves | FA2010 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | DAN4358.01
  • Susan Sgorbati | FA2010 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | DAN4358.01

Artist's Portfolio

Explaining art work often goes against the grain, yet artists are regularly called upon to articulate their processes, tools, and dynamics of collaboration. To help secure any of the myriad forms of institutional support including funding, venues, and engagements, artists must develop, creatively and flexibly, essential skills. Finding a public language for what is the private process of creation is an art in itself. Furthermore, understanding and discovering ways to adapt to changing economic realities is a critical component of making work; bringing the work into the world is a natural part of the artist's process. This course addresses basic issues involved in generating, developing, producing, and presenting art work. Students will write artist statements, press releases, biographical statements, resumes, c.v.'s, grants and cover letters; will prepare budgets, will organize promotional portfolios/videotapes; will interview each other; and will give short lecture demonstrations. Prerequisites: Advanced level work in one of the art forms. Permission of the instructor.

  • Dana Reitz | FA2012 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | DAN4366.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2013 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | DAN4366.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2010 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MUS4366.01
  • Dana Reitz | FA2011 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4366.01

Energy

Energy has been called the "universal currency" (Vaclav Smil) but also "a very subtle concept... very, very difficult to get right" (Richard Feynman). Building on skills started in physical computing, we will, through generating and measuring electricity, gain a more nuanced and quantitative understanding of energy in various forms. We will turn kinetic and solar energy into electrical energy, store that energy in batteries and capacitors, and use it to power small devices. We will develop skills useful in a variety of undertakings, from citizen science (distributed remote sensor networks) to large-scale art installations. Students will build a final project using skills learned in the class. Prerequisites: None.

  • Jeff Feddersen | SP2012 | Th, 8:10AM-12:00PM | SCMA2110.01

Instrument Building

A course on instrument building in the 20th century, focusing on experimental instruments and unheard-of sounds. A survey will introduce students to the innovations of Harry Partch, new gamelans, circuit bending, and intonation theory. Students are required to design, construct, and perform on at least two different instruments during the term. Students will be asked to be critical about the visual and sonic aesthetic of their new instruments, and to explore how instrument design can reinvent musical tradition and performance practice. Class will also regularly use, restore, and adapt the Schonbeck instrumentarium at Bennington College. Prerequisites: Prior work in music. Permission of the instructor.

  • Nicholas Brooke | SP2011 | T, 8:30PM-10:20PM | MUS4224.01

Myths and Hymns: Music Theater Performance

Ambition. Pride. Love. Loss. Forgiveness. In his bold 1998 song cycle, Myths and Hymns, Adam Guettel re-imagines Greek myth with millennial intensity. He stumbled upon a 19th century Presbyterian hymnal, and then interwove the lyrics into his song cycle. Musical styles range from lush Art Song to Rock to Latin to R & B to Gospel and Jazz. This performance project invites students to explore in depth how mythology, musical phrasing, and rhapsodic lyricism speak to how we live, what we have done, and how we reassess what we can become. The course work entails the hours of study both in and out of rehearsal. Performers will be asked to make physical work, both individually and collaboratively. This course is open to singers, actors, dancers, designers, assistant directors, musicians, and dramaturges. Rehearsals, techs, and performances constitute the student's commitment. Prerequisites: Auditions and Callbacks are open to all and will be held on Saturday December 1 and Sunday December 2 from 2 pm to 6 pm in Jennings. Please prepare a 2-minute musical selection and bring sheet music for the accompanist.

  • Jean Randich | SP2013 | , - | MUS4015.01
  • Thomas Bogdan | SP2013 | , - | MUS4015.01

Pronounced: the International Phonetic Alphabet

The International Phonetic Alphabet is an important and very useful tool for language and voice students. It allows one to pronounce an alphabet of symbols that represent sounds used in all languages. Singers of classical music perform music in a minimum of five languages. They are not expected to be fluent in all of these languages, but they are expected to pronounce them convincingly, as if each were their mother tongue. Similarly, many language students have difficulty with sounds that are not part of their native language. For these students too the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) is an invaluable tool: learning the IPA and the rules of pronunciation can help classical singers and language students master the pronunciation of many different languages. The course will focus first on learning the IPA for the English language. We will then go on to use poetry as a tool for learning the basic rules of additional symbols and pronunciation in other languages - Italian, French, German and Spanish. Depending on the individual needs of the students, the rules for pronunciation of other languages can also be included in this course. Prerequisites: None.

  • Martha Herr | SP2012 | W, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | FLE2110.01

Sound Studies

How do we hear? Why do we listen? From religious chant to village bells to elevator muzak to noise pollution, sound has played a major role in human cultures and human experience since time immemorial. In this course, students will approach and engage critically with sound, listening, hearing, and aurality as categories for the analysis of societies from prehistory to the present day. Readings will be drawn from history, anthropology, philosophy, literature, art, music, environmental studies, and science studies. In addition to weekly readings, students will be asked to write papers, partake in listening/sound exercises, and confect creative projects that engage with the themes of the class. Prerequisites: One course in social science or music.

  • Stephen Higa | FA2012 | TF, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | HIS4108.01

Writing About Music

For students who want to show advanced work in music in written form. How do you write about music? With ingenuity, evoking the music in the ear of your reader. With heart, deciphering the music's purpose within personal and social contexts. With credibility, bringing analytical discussion from theoretical symbology into verbal expression without losing investigative drive. With skill, transcribing scored examples of brief moments that demonstrate your thesis. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and/or faculty recommendation.

  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MUS4124.01

Music Composition

Advanced Projects in E-Music

This course will focus on composition in the electro-acoustic medium. Students may choose to develop their technical skills in any of the following areas: sound synthesis, digital signal processing, digital audio recording and surround sound 5.1 spatialization. Students are expected to complete an electro-acoustic composition in surround sound to be presented in concert at term's end. Students are also expected to complete short readings, participate in class discussions and to present their creative work on a regular basis in class sessions. An intermediate to advanced level tutorial. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

  • Randall Neal | SP2013 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4139.01
  • Randall Neal | SP2014 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4139.01
  • Randall Neal | FA2013 | M, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MCO4139.01

Beginning Composing

This class explores and reviews notation and the rudiments of music through the act of composing small pieces for a variety of instruments. It is intended for students who have taken instrumental lessons for a few years or more and who can read music in at least one clef. It is meant for those who have never imagined composing music as well as for those who have already begun writing music. We will take a hands-on approach to learning about such matters as intervals, modes, key signatures, and the fundamentals of tonal harmony through using these musical elements creatively. The students are also encouraged to produce original creative work that is not tied to learning any particular materials, but simply reflect the student's imagination and instincts. Students are requested to show work during the term at Music Workshop. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Allen Shawn | FA2010 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4120.01
  • Allen Shawn | FA2011 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4120.01
  • Allen Shawn | FA2013 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4120.01
  • Allen Shawn | SP2013 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4120.01
  • Kenji Bunch | FA2012 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4120.01

Composing - Performers' Ensemble

This ensemble will be comprised of performing musicians who also compose and/or improvise. The focus will be on the reading of new works, composed specifically for the instrumental possibilities within the group. By reading and rehearsing material generated by the ensemble members (and perhaps other student composers) on a weekly basis, students will get a chance to improve both their writing skills and reading skills in the areas of: 1) through-composed notated music, 2) music with improvised sections, and 3) improvised music using written directions and/or graphic scores. Ensemble blend and overall musicianship will also be addressed. Prerequisites: Ability to read music and some experience with improvisation.

  • Bruce Williamson | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | MPF4239.01

Composing for Strings

The instruments of the string family have been essential components of written music for centuries, and continue to serve as the backbone for contemporary orchestral and chamber works, as well as in the production of jazz, pop, rock, and hip-hop arranging. In this course, we will examine important milestones in string writing, including virtuoso solo works from J.S. Bach to Eugene Ysaÿe, the genesis of the string quartet from Haydn to Bartók, orchestral writing from the Mannheim School to Mahler and Debussy, experimental works from the 17th century (Biber, Vivaldi) to Penderecki and Crumb, and pop arranging from Nelson Riddle to The Beatles' Eleanor Rigby, Motown, and beyond (Coldplay, Verve, Kanye West). To supplement the in-depth study of this existing canon, we will draw upon the vocabularies of these composers to create our own original works that we will workshop in class as a practicum. As a final end-of-term project, we will organize an open reading of original student compositions and arrangements by professional string players from the NYC area. Prerequisites: Fluency in musical notation, one prior course in music composition.

  • Kenji Bunch | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4110.01

Composing for the Choir

Composers who sing (or would like to), singers who compose (or would like to), songwriters who would like to stop singing alone, writers who would like to hear their writings sung (and maybe sing some too) and anyone who's always wanted to learn how to shape music for a vocal group---this class is for you. We will compose, rehearse and then perform our own repertoire in several live concert effusions through the term. Fun, hard work, and more fun. Prerequisites: Previous voice, composition, or writing classes. A performative understanding of music theory. Permission of the instructor. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2012 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MCO4130.01

Composition Project: Acoustic/Electronic

In this course students will compose a substantial work for one solo instrument with fixed-medium (CD) electro-acoustic accompaniment. Class will meet twice a week; on Monday, Randall Neal will review the history of compositions involving acoustic instuments with electronics and provide technical instuction in the electronic music studio (using ProTools 9, for the recording, editing and arranging of sounds, and GRM Tools for the digital transformation and re-synthesis of sounds). On Thursdays, Allen Shawn will provide further listening and discussion of the compositions, focusing on the live instrumental component. Compositions will be performed at a culminating concert. Prerequisites: Good notational skills, previous classes, and permission of the instructor.

  • Allen Shawn | SP2012 | MTh, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4501.01
  • Randall Neal | SP2012 | MTh, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4501.01

Composition Projects: TimeTable

A composition intensive in writing for percussion trio. Students will imagine, compose, and notate a piece for the professional trio TimeTable. Well look at music for percussion in the 20th century (Cage, Xenakis, and Varese, as well as music from around the world), and how it has been a groundbreaking venue for exploring timbre, polyrhythm, and texture. Students will learn how to compose idiomatically for marimba, vibraphone, and other instruments, while adapting their musical imagination to the physicality of TimeTable's performers. All pieces will be performed in an end-of-term workshop concert. Prerequisites: Previous composition course; permission of the instructor.

  • Nicholas Brooke | FA2010 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4103.01

Composition Studio: Form

In focusing on harmony and rhythm, composers often lose the forest for the trees, sacrificing form for detail. This compositional intensive will focus on different approaches to creating large-scale form in music, based on students' own advanced projects. Part of the class will be dedicated to aural analyses of music from across a broad spectrum of genres, and students will be expected to engage critically with the question of how to effectively structure their own work. Students will be expected to create a new composition of at least ten minutes in length, as well as several miniatures. Composers across genres (instrumental, electronic, multidisciplinary) are welcome. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Nicholas Brooke | FA2011 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4803.01

Computer Programming for Musical Applications

This course serves as an introduction to creating computer music environments within the Max/MSP programming language. Relevant aspects of music and digital audio technologies will be addressed as they relate to the class assignments. Students are expected to complete short exercises and show work regularly in class, culminating in a self-designed final project. Skills learned in this course are applicable towards future work in algorithmic composition, interactive environments, and digital signal processing. Prerequisites: None.

  • Daniel Roninson | FA2012 | , - | MCO2108.01
  • Jeremy Stewart | FA2012 | , - | MCO2108.01

E-music Projects: Graphic Synthesis & Sonification

Graphic sound synthesis was pioneered by Iannis Xenakis with his UPIC computer music system. In this environment, the composer can draw, paint, or use imported digital imagery either to generate sound directly, or to signal process sounds. MetaSynth has often been refered to as "the American UPIC". It is not a synthesizer, but a digital sound engine that provides the composer with a wide assortment of digital sound synthesis techniques. In addition to abstract sound generation, MetaSynth also makes it easy for composers to explore unusual scales and scale tuning systems. Sonification is the use of non-vocal audio to perceptualize data. Information drawn from any source in the real world may be translated directly into sound using graphic synthesis. Graphic synthesis and sonification provide composers with an engaging poetic as well as wide open horizons for sonic exploration. Students are expected to complete short readings, participate in discussions, present their creative work on a regular basis in class sessions, and to complete a substantial project by term's end. An intermediate to advanced level tutorial. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Randall Neal | FA2012 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4375.01
  • Randall Neal | SP2011 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4375.01

Electronic Music: Creativity and Sound

How do you compose when any sound can be used in music? This course provides a wide-ranging exploration into strategies for sound-based composition and the digital transformation of sound. Students will create original sounds and compositions in the electronic music studio. Students are expected to complete short readings, participate in discussions, present their creative work on a regular basis in class sessions and complete two studio projects. The afternoon lab session will cover digital audio recording, digital signal processing, and compositional practice in the electronic music studio. Prerequisites: None.

  • Randall Neal | FA2010 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO2109.01
  • Randall Neal | FA2011 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO2109.01
  • Randall Neal | FA2012 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO2109.01
  • Randall Neal | SP2011 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO2109.01
  • Randall Neal | SP2012 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO2109.01
  • Randall Neal | SP2013 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO2109.01
  • Randall Neal | SP2014 | M, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO2109.01
  • Randall Neal | FA2013 | M, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO2109.01

Film Music

The practice of underscoring movies is as old as film itself, from early improvised accompaniments to silent films, to the orchestrations of Bernard Herrmann and Ennio Morricone. In this course, we will look and listen to a variety of films and sound scores throughout the ages, analyzing the way in which they act as counterpoint to plot and the visual score. Musical analysis of these films, and writing about/discussion of film scores will serve as background to the students' own projects. Students will be expected to provide musical accompaniment to a variety of films by the end of the term (which may include collaborations with other students' projects in video and animation) as well as orchestration of previously existing films, such as early silent film. Students will be expected to record and synch their music within a digital environment. Prerequisites: A previous composition or theory course, or permission of the instructor.

  • Nicholas Brooke | FA2012 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4101.01

Music Composition Intensive

Students who wish to study composing intensively may be eligible for a small group tutorial or where appropriate, individual lessons. In general, students taking this course are expected to compose in longer forms and with more varied instrumentation than previously attempted. This course may be taken at the intermediate or advanced level. Prerequisites: Previous composition and theory courses. Permission of the instructor.

  • Allen Shawn | FA2010 | , - | MCO4801.01
  • Allen Shawn | FA2011 | , - | MCO4801.01
  • Allen Shawn | FA2013 | , - | MCO4801.01
  • Allen Shawn | FA2010 | , - | MCO4801.02
  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2010 | , - | MCO4801.03
  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2011 | , - | MCO4801.03

Music Composition Project

This class offers experienced composers a chance to focus on a composition for one medium for the entire term. Class time is divided between listening and discussion sessions, in which works for the chosen medium are examined, and weekly evaluations of how the students own work is progressing. The students meet regularly one-on-one with the instructor, and also meet as group to hear each others developing pieces. There are periodic readings of the works-in-progress, allowing for learning what is and is not working, refining of musical ideas and of the instrumental writing. The course culminates with a concert of the works produced. This is followed by the writing of a short piece for piano or other easily available instrument, as a final assignment. Prerequisites: A previous composition course; permission of the instructor.

  • Allen Shawn | SP2011 | MTh, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4802.01
  • Allen Shawn | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4802.01

Projects in E-Music: The Acousmatic Experience

The term acousmatic describes a musical performance in which both performer and instrument are absent. The audience has no visual cues, all mental imagery results from the sounds alone, and access to the composers work is mediated solely through loudspeakers controlled by a sound projectionist. Close examination of this listening environment reveals that it provides a composer with unique opportunities for exploring the listeners musical perception. Students will create original compositions in the electronic music studio using a surround-sound spatialization system. Students are expected to complete short readings, participate in discussions, and present their creative work on a regular basis in class sessions. An intermediate to advanced level tutorial. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Randall Neal | FA2010 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4377.01
  • Randall Neal | FA2011 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MCO4377.01

Room Tone

As part of the Room Tone Festival (mid-April), students will work on projects that explore the juncture of sound and space, listening and location. In this workshop, students will develop a location-specific toolkit with sound artist Michelle Nagai '97. As a group, we will examine daily practices of observation, recording, and research. The end goal can be an installation, collaboration, or the chronicling of a daily practice, though students will be asked to share their work at the festival in late April. Students will be expected to do background readings, develop a wiki for communication and documentation, and collaborate with other students and artists. Students are expected to have previous work in sonic mediums and/or related arts. This course meets for the first seven weeks of the term. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Nicholas Brooke | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MCO4106.01

Songwriting: The Partnership of Lyrics and Music

For students who are writing songs but feel uncertain when it comes to adding lyrics or for those who want to explore the process more deeply, this course will look at how language, rhythm, rhyme scheme, melody and form work together to express a strong vision. We will be listening to artists who have made lyric writing an art. We will open doors to new ideas through group exercises and we will workshop students' songs in progress. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30-8pm).

  • Julie Last | SP2013 | F, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MCO2207.01

Sound Installation

In this course we'll examine and create sound pieces that differ from traditional musical performances in that they are longer, larger, and/or (more directly) interactive. Topics will include: process music and algorithmic composition; mechanized and computerized sound making; strategies for remote power, processing and amplification; sensors. Students will critique representative works and create their own, culminating in an end-of-term exhibition. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

  • Jeff Feddersen | SP2012 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | VA4151.01

Whose Opera?

Looking for six able composers, six able writers and six able singer/actors. Or those who combine these abilities. Example of bi-weekly assignment: short operatic sketch by six teams of writer-composers for singer-actors. Writer starts - delivering libretto to composer who sets words to music, and team delivers sketch to class one week later. After sketch is critiqued in class, singer-actor(s) prepare sketch for following week with composers musical assistance. Writers must contribute to performance in some way as well. Finished sketches presented at Music Workshop during term. Course will culminate in evening-length public showing of successful sketches. No musical style requirements. For writers: a clear understanding of spoken word and the sonic effects of language. For actor/singers: self-directed quick-study acting ability. For everyone: enough music literacy to speed communication but sight-reading not required - willingness to learn, imagination, memory, acting ability, and good intonation crucial. Prerequisites: Writers must submit a sample to kbrazelton@bennington.edu one week prior to registration. Composer/singers/actors must submit references from Music Composition/Voice/Drama faculty one week prior to registration. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MCO4361.01
  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2013 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MCO4361.01

Music Fundamentals

Groundwork Lab

This is the required two-hour lab that accompanies MFN2110 Groundwork: What You Need to Know to Make Music. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: MFN2110 Groundwork: What You Need to Know to Make Music.

  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2012 | , - | MFN2111.01

Groundwork: What You Need to Know Music Lab


  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2013 | , - | MFN2110L.01
  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2012 | , - | MFN2110L.01
  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2011 | W, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN2110L.01

Groundwork: What You Need to Know to Make Music

You may or may not play an instrument. It doesn't matter. What matters is how you think, how you hear, how you communicate, and your willingness to adapt that knowledge to the musical field. We will learn to listen to music, talk about music, improvise music, write music, write about music, read music, and read about music, but most of all we will learn to collaborate to make music unique to the class and the individuals in it. No matter what your background, come prepared to play. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm). Students must also register for the lab, MFN2111. Two-hour small-group music labs will be scheduled after the first week.

  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MFN2110.01
  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2012 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MFN2110.01
  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2013 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MFN2110.01
  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2012 | TF, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MFN2110.01

Intermediate/Advanced Aural Skills

Rhythmic exercises, sight singing, and dictation are used to enhance listening and performance. Classes will focus on intermediate to advanced aural skills. This course is highly recommended to all involved in music and to anyone wishing to improve their ears. Prerequisites: Groundworks course or equivalent. Placement test required. Contact Suzanne Jones, x4510 for details.

  • Jeremy Stewart | FA2011 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN4129.01
  • Jeremy Stewart | SP2012 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN4129.01
  • John Eagle | SP2011 | W, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN4129.01

Music Groundwork: Listening/Playing

What makes a good performance? What makes a good musician? How does one compose music? How does one improvise music? Music is not unlike many other endeavors, games or structures in that a better understanding of the "workings" usually leads to increased appreciation and enjoyment. This course will involve both "playing" and "grounding" (learning some of the "rules of the game"). By examining and playing various music genres from places around the world such as Ireland, Brazil, Cuba, the U.S. and Africa, students will start to learn the important elements that go into making music with others. We will explore ways to improve our abilities to accurately hear the contours of melody, the harmonic "pull" of chord progressions and the interlocking framework of rhythmic patterns. We will start to "decode" the mysteries of music notation, explore aspects of improvisation and strive to apply both precision and flexibility to ensemble performance situations. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Groundworks Lab, Tuesday 4:10 - 6pm

  • Bruce Williamson | SP2011 | W, 8:20AM-12:00PM | MFN2171.01

Music Groundwork: Listening/Playing Lab


  • Bruce Williamson | SP2011 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN2171L.01

Music Groundwork: Reading, Writing, Listening

A crash course on the basic language of music: rhythms, intervals, scales, modes, melodies and harmonies. Students will learn to hear, transcribe, and notate these elements while listening to, composing and performing a wide variety of styles. Special emphasis will be placed on listening to musics from across the world and on creating original compositions. Class will include an additional lab, focused on ear-training and notation. Prerequisites: None.

  • John Eagle | FA2010 | MW, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MFN2101.01
  • Nicholas Brooke | FA2010 | MW, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MFN2101.01

Music Groundwork: Reading, Writing, Listening Lab


  • John Eagle | FA2010 | W, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN2101L.01
  • Nicholas Brooke | FA2010 | W, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN2101L.01

Music Toolkit: Hearing and Singing Music

This course is designed to further the understanding and identification of the symbols of music and to integrate them into practical application.  Scales, intervals and rythmic notation will be reviewed and be used to sing simple pieces of music.  We will deal with melody and harmony through reading single melodic lines, four part Bach Chorales and other music in most of the classes. Repetition of the process will enforce the learning process.  The use of the language of music will be encouraged by homework assignments of melodic writing, which will then be sight-read by the class. The aim of the class is to reinforce fundamentals learned in groundworks and to expand on the use of the language of music through singing.  Prerequisites: None.

  • Thomas Bogdan | SP2013 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN2108.01

Music Toolkit: Notation/Transcription

A crash course in writing music down with fluency and elegance. We'll transcribe everything from pop songs to oral traditions, while also woodshedding dictation and melodic/rhythmic notation. Students are expected to read music, at least a bit--we're not starting from square one. This course will help you read, notate, and hear scores with greater ease. Prerequisites: Some preliminary knowledge of notation. Permission of the instructor.

  • Nicholas Brooke | SP2013 | Th, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN2106.01

Music Toolkit: Piano

This course is intended for almost-beginners and intermediate level musicians with no experience playing the piano. An ability to play the piano is of enormous benefit to anyone who wishes to understand or pursue Western music of any kind. The goal of the class is to familiarize the students with the keyboard; learn simple, fun pieces for both hands; solidify music reading skills in two clefs; and to open up the piano as a future reference point for composing, the study of musical scores, and the learning of harmony and counterpoint. Prerequisites: Groundworks or permission of instructor. Corequisites: Music Workshop, Tuesday 6:30-8pm

  • Valerie Peters | SP2013 | M, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN2109.01

Music Toolkit: Rhythm

This course is meant for almost-beginners and intermediate students wanting to gain a better understanding of RHYTHM. We will review how meters function, how syncopation and polyrhythms are created and how rhythmic patterns are notated. The ability to recognize and execute various rhythms is critical to improving one's musicianship. Rhythm adds interest and energy to all types of music. Prerequisites: Groundworks or permission of instructor.

  • Bruce Williamson | SP2013 | W, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MFN2107.01

Music History

African Music Ensemble

African Music Ensemble explores the music, drumming and songs of West Africa and Mozambique. This performance ensemble will explore traditional bala (West African xylophone), djembe, dundunba, kpanlogo, n'todje, shakere, and songs in Wolof, Manding, Yoruba. Prerequisites: Drumming: An Extension of Language and/or approval of instructor.

  • Michael Wimberly | SP2014 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MHI4134.01

America's History Through Her Music: 1500-1900

Start with the tributaries: European, African, then Caribbean. Trace these forward in great whorls, mingling currents in a hard-rushing river. For instance, chamber music from Germany in the Pennsylvania countryside was venerated by the High Anglican merchants in Philadelphia and the gentlemen farmers further south. And while those noble white gentlemen listened in parlors to their imports, hambone and ring shout replaced forbidden West African drums in the slave barracks, giving way to Gospel when sons of New England fishermen came preaching the Great Awakening. Black Gospel is Pilgrim hymn. Appreciation of the sonata da camera has always denoted high social standing, here in America. And a hundred years before John Brown, you could hear the Civil War coming if you knew what to listen for. Prerequisites: None.

  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MHI2103.01

Battle of the Bands: Blackface, Brass, & Civil War

Bands of today have a deep American ancestry. Minstrel bands in blackface snapped their banjos to the backbeat, clicked bones in swing-time and ran gags that begat shtick. Regional pride was embedded in every town's homeboy brass band, decked out in gold braid uniforms, mustaches, and the latest European harmony, these outdoor musical armies broadcast more than tunes - sex, fashion, and Civil War politics for starters. After the war, the newborn Black show biz offered bands of jubilee singers and Black blackface minstrels, tight-knit troupes who grew into barbershop "quartets", answered by singing Country family-bands. But that's just the beginning... Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Attendance at three Music Workshops (Tues 6:30 - 8pm) and three Sacred Harp classes (Thursday between 7 and 9:30pm).

  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2012 | W, 8:00AM-12:00PM | MHI2115.01

Chant- Why, When, Where, How

The ritual singing of Christian liturgy in the West-like its parent Judaic cantorial tradition and cousin Koranic recitation-reached an improvisational peak under Pépin the Short in 8th-c. France-to-be. Way, way after Gregory was supposed to have received "Gregorian" chant from heaven, a myth we owe to Pépin's son Charlemagne and his political machine. Then, as musical fashions always will, chant passed from process to artifact. But no ordinary artifact. Similar to the visual symbol of the cross that plots the footprint of cathedrals to this day, chant's melodic symbology still underlies Western music. How? Come hear. Come chant. Prerequisites: Music literacy and knowledge of music theory. Sight-singing ability welcomed. Corequisites: Music Workshop, Tuesday 6:30-8pm.

  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2013 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MHI2118.01

Exploring 20th Century American & British Art Song

This class will delve into the commonalities and differences between the two countries: The poetic, prosaic and political influence of the time on compositional style, structure, invention and unconventionality from the "Industrial Revolution" to WWII. Some composers of note: Edward MacDowell, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Charles Ives, Amy Beach, Aaron Copland, Benjamin Britten, Henry Cowell, Roger Quilter. Prerequisites: None.

  • Rachel Rosales | FA2013 | W, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2119.01

Leonard Bernstein's World

This course will explore the multi-faceted world of Leonard Bernstein through listening assignments, readings, and the viewing of documentary and musical films. First and foremost in our study will be Bernstein's varied output as a composer. We will listen to his major works for musical theater as well as many of those for the concert hall, and we will discuss the issues raised by his life and work, particularly his attempt to simultaneously inhabit two different musical worlds. Other topics to be touched upon will be his achievements as a conductor; his musical philosophy (as expressed in his celebrated Young People's Concerts, and Harvard Norton Lectures); and his political activities, which resulted at times in professional risks, public ridicule, and surveillance on the part of the FBI. In addition to music by Bernstein, we will listen to music by Haydn, Beethoven, Mahler, Ives and other composers. Students will be expected to do extensive reading and listening, some oral presentations, and a serious amount of written work. Prerequisites: None.

  • Allen Shawn | FA2011 | MTh, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2175.01
  • Allen Shawn | SP2013 | MTh, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2175.01

Locating Ethnomusicology

This library-intensive seminar examines the elusive figure of the ethnomusicologist, tracing the increasingly diverse methodologies surrounding so-called world music. By reading seminal texts in ethnomusicology, across a range of musical cultures, we'll look at how the study of musical culture has expanded beyond its roots in the early 20th century. We'll study four paradigms: the ethnomusicologist as writer (Nettl, Slobin, Perlman, et al.); as recordist (Lomax, Yampolsky, Sublime Frequencies); as videographer (Les Blank, JVC), and finally as, sometimes, creator/collaborator/composer. This course is based in Crossett library, and students are expected to produce exhaustive annotated bibliographies on their chosen areas of study, as well as advanced writing. We will pay special attention to the changing role of ethnomusicology in the digital age, and how documentation has changed through revolutions in media. Prerequisites: None.

  • Nicholas Brooke | SP2012 | TF, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MHI2120.01

Medieval Ritual

Music always has its context. Sacred music would not "work" unless buttressed and enhanced by other sacred sounds as well as sacred sights, tastes, smells, places, gestures, texts, and objects. In this course we will place Christian music in its context by examining the various ritual, perfomative, sensual, interpretive, literary, and theological experiences that suround it. In doing so, we will also come to understand sacred music's larger context: that is, the social, political, and economic forces that also contribute to making the music "work". Any study of ritual must involve performance (bodily knowledge). So, in addition to reading and writing assignments, students will be asked to partake in performance work that engages with the topics and themes of the class. Prerequisites: Prior work in music history, literature, or social sciences.

  • Stephen Higa | SP2014 | TF, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MHI4132.01

Miles Davis (1926-1991): Jazz Pioneer

This course will study the 40-year career of legendary jazz trumpeter and innovative band leader Miles Davis. We will examine his beginnings in the Be-Bop movement as a sideman with Charlie Parker, his two famous quintets (one with John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley, the other with Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock), his collaborations with arranger Gil Evans, and his "fusion" recordings (jazz with rock, funk and world music) of the 70s and 80s (from the Bitches Brew recording to bands with guitarists Mike Stern and John Scofield). We will study how his playing style and ever-changing conceptual vision of jazz influenced countless musicians to follow. There will be listening, reading, and writing assignments pertaining to the various musical eras and their social context in American Culture. Prerequisites: None.

  • Bruce Williamson | FA2012 | TF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2226.01

Music as an Instrument for Social Change

This course will examine how music has provided strength and solidarity to various protest movements of the 20th century, often with dedicated support from student populations. We will look for examples of injustice and oppression which resulted in powerful musical expressions of both descriptive concern and angry defiance. Some of the social movements with a rich partnership in music will include: civil rights in the US, the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, anti-war movements, free speech movements, various labor struggles and other fights against racism, sexism and religious or national persecution. We will compare lyrics and opinions of artists as varied as Woody Guthrie, Bob Marley and John Lennon, noting how musical styles such as folk, rock, reggae and gospel can help unify a group of people with a common cause. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Students will be required to attend weekly screenings of pertinent films: Thursdays, 7-9 pm.

  • Bruce Williamson | FA2011 | W, 2:10PM- 6:00PM | APA2114.01

Music Compositions for Dance

Music Compositions for Dance views and reflects on landmark compositions created for dance companies and choreographers in the 20th & 21st centuries. Students will be challenged with composition and choreography assignments using traditional notation, graphics, texts, garage band, logic audio, protools and alternative recording approaches. Prerequisites: None.

  • Michael Wimberly | FA2012 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MHI2105.01
  • Michael Wimberly | FA2013 | T, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MHI2105.01

Music History Lecture Series

The class will meet weekly for twelve lectures on varied topics, given by music faculty on a rotating basis. The lectures will be arranged chronologically, focusing on a diversity of musical traditions. Lecture topics will include, among others: discussions of Medieval and Renaissance Music; gamelan and other Asian traditions, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, the Romantic era, the 20th century, and the explosion of jazz styles in the 1960s. Students will be expected to do the reading and listening work by each class, and follow-up written assignments. Nick Brooke will coordinate the series and be present at all sessions. Prerequisites: None.

  • Nicholas Brooke | SP2012 | T, 8:30PM-10:20PM | MHI2000.01
  • Nicholas Brooke | SP2014 | T, 8:30PM-10:20PM | MHI2000.01

Music Since 1968

In this course we focus our attention on a few of the most exciting and influential composers of the past thirty years. Works by such composers as Elliott Carter, Toru Takemitsu, Olivier Messiaen, Pierre Boulez, Alfred Schnittke, Luciano Berio, Charles Wuorinen, Frederick Rzewski, John Adams, John Harbison, Galina Ustvolskaya, Gyorgi Kurtag, Gyorgi Ligeti, Sofia Gubaidulina, Louis Andriessen, and Kaija Saariaho are listened to and discussed in class. The course is open to students from all disciplines and without prerequisites, but a high level of work is required. There are assigned readings and listening assignments. Music students are expected to write a substantial paper on one composer and to make a presentation on that composer in class. They are responsible for helping to explain the musical approaches and techniques we discuss to the non-music students. Students without a music background are also expected to write a substantial paper on a composer and to give a presentation in class, but are encouraged to draw analogies between the music we study and work in the other arts, and to place the music studied in a historical, philosophical, or scientific context. Prerequisites: None

  • Allen Shawn | SP2014 | MTh, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2228.01

Musical Forms

This class focuses on musical architecture, by examining important and beautiful works from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, and discussing the traditional forms they exemplify. We will listen to works by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Brahms, Mahler, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Berg, and Rzewski (among others), analyzing their structures in detail. Forms to be studied will include concerto grosso, chorale prelude, sonata form, theme and variations, passacaglia, and fugue. Traditional or not, each piece of music is unique. We will discuss the tension between structure and imagination, predetermined form and the individual creative impulse, and we will ponder such questions as what we mean by musical coherence or by the notion that we are "following" a piece of music, and where we would draw the line between structure and chaos or whether such a distinction is simply a matter of opinion. Non-musicians will be expected to learn some musical fundamentals and to develop some skill at score reading, and to immerse themselves in the materials and issues of the course through listening and outside readings. Course work will include listenings, readings, a journal, two mid-size papers, and responses to four music workshops. The ability to read music and knowledge of the rudiments of harmony are recommended, but not required. Prerequisites: None.

  • Allen Shawn | FA2010 | MTh, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2240.01
  • Allen Shawn | FA2013 | MTh, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2240.01

Song for Ireland and Celtic Connections

Celtic music from Ireland, Scotland, Bretagne, Galacia, and Cape Breton will be experienced, studied, and performed using instruments and voices. We'll find and cross the musical bridges between regions--from the ballads of Ireland, Scotland and Wales to the Alalas of Spain and dance tunes of Brittany. An end-of-term presentation will be prepared drawing on inspiration from traditional forms. Students must bring a guitar, banjo, mandolin, or fiddle (or other social instrument) to class for purposes of furthering personal music making through traditional forms. We will practice and perform as a group, improving our reading and aural skills. Prerequisites: Must have your own instrument.

  • John Kirk | SP2011 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2251.01
  • John Kirk | SP2012 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2251.01
  • John Kirk | SP2013 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2251.01
  • John Kirk | SP2014 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2251.01

The History of Rock 'n' Roll, Part One

You probably think that the history of rock 'n' roll begins in the 1950s. So why should you study a general history of American music starting in the 16th century? Because if you don't, you will never truly understand rock 'n' roll. Rock 'n' roll begins in Africa, West and Central, in Spain, in Germany, Italy and France and in the British Isles. When people leave their homelands, the few traditions they are able to carry to the new land become more-not less-dear. And the collision of these close-held immigrating practices is what makes rock 'n' roll so fierce. A fierceness that could only happen here in the U. S. Find out why. This is the first half of a year-long course. In the fall we will cover the 16th-19th-century roots. In the spring, we will review the vitally important 19th century and proceed on to rock 'n' roll itself. The fall course or its equivalent is pre-requisite for the spring course. Some knowledge of music is helpful but not required. Music literacy is of great benefit for analytical projects, research projects and class presentations. Remedial help for those less sure in music will be available outside of class. Prerequisites: None.

  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2010 | WF, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MHI2104.01

The History of Rock 'n' Roll, Part One - Advanced

Please read the description for MHI2104 The History of Rock 'n' Roll, Part One. Students attend lectures for MHI2104, and meet for an additional two hours seminar-style to delve deeper into the musical anatomy of lecture topics. Eligible students should understand tonal and modal harmony, and be able to read, write and transcribe music with rhythmic skill. Expect at least two in-depth research projects to include rhythmic, harmonic and textual analysis. Instrumental proficiency extremely beneficial for performance of historical repertoire. Prerequisites: One to two terms of music theory including harmonic analysis, one term of music history or equivalent; or by faculty recommendation. Corequisites: Attendance at all MHI2104 lectures, WF 2:10 - 4pm.

  • Kitty Brazelton | FA2010 | Th, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MHI4104.01

The History of Rock 'n' Roll, Part Two

After a general review of fall's findings, we will continue our yearlong look at the ancientness of rock 'n' roll. Brass bands, jubilee choirs and minstrel revues will escort us into the 20th century, through the effusion of 1920s roots and race records into radio, big bands and the Latin dance explosion. We'll arrive in the '50s, witness the birth of be-my-baby in all its glorious inevitability only to collide with the stern modal and moral reformation of the folk movement while the Brits crank up their warrior echo of Delta Blues. We'll wrap up with a question: is rock indeed the music of rebellion or is it a music of abiding resolution? Prerequisites: MHI2104 The History of Rock 'n' Roll, Part One, or permission of the instructor.

  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2011 | TF, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MHI4204.01

The History of Rock 'n' Roll, Part Two - Advanced

Students attend lectures for MHI4204, The History of Rock 'n' Roll, Part Two, and meet for an additional two hours seminar-style to delve deeper into the musical anatomy of lecture topics. Eligible students should understand tonal and modal harmony, and be able to read, write and transcribe music with rhythmic skill. Expect at least two in-depth research projects to include rhythmic, harmonic and textual analysis. Instrumental proficiency is extremely beneficial for performance of historical repertoire. Prerequisites: One term of music theory including harmonic analysis, and one term of music history or equivalent; or permission of the instructor. Corequisites: Attendance at all MHI4204 History of Rock 'n' Roll Part Two lectures, TF 2:10 - 4pm.

  • Kitty Brazelton | SP2011 | W, 4:10PM- 6:00PM | MHI4304.01

The Music of Bollywood

This course surveys the musical side of the largest film industry in the world, and its production, influences, and remixes on the contemporary scene. We will trace the development of modern "filmi" through earlier composers such as R.D. Burman, to the recent, eclectic songs of A.R. Rahman. Special consideration will be made of the contributions of Hindustani/Carnatic classical music, as well as the influence of regional styles and worldwide pop on film songs. We will look at how film recordings are produced, as well as Bollywood's influence and echoes in contemporary remix and diasporic genres. Regular film screenings are part of the class, as well as readings from recent literature. Prerequisites: None.

  • Nicholas Brooke | FA2011 | T, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MHI2205.01

The Music of J.S. Bach

This course will be a group exploration of some of the high points in the glorious music of Johann Sebastian Bach, including the Mass in B minor, the Saint Matthew Passion, the Magnificat, the Brandenburg Concertos, the Well-Tempered Clavier, the Musical Offering, and the Unaccompanied Suites for Cello. We will also consider Bach's continuing influence on the music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and listen to transcriptions of Bach's music by Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Louis Andriessen and others. Assignments will include listening assignments, readings, several student oral reports, and papers. Although nominally a "lecture" course, the emphasis will be on listening, discussion, and collaborative investigation, and the students will be asked to research and present findings on subjects pertaining to Bach's life, the instruments used in his day, and the religious texts he set to music. Prerequisites: None.

  • Allen Shawn | SP2011 | MTh, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2177.01

Traditional Music of North America

This course explores music from early native music through contemporary singer-songwriters. Some of the traditions we draw from include African, Native American, Quebecois, Appalachian, Irish and Scottish, British Isle traditions, Cajun, Blues, Gospel, and Conjunto music. Instrumental, dance, and ballad traditions are explored. Students must bring a guitar, banjo, mandolin, or fiddle (or other social instrument) to class for purposes of furthering personal music making through traditional forms. We will practice and perform as a group, improving our reading and aural skills. Other instruments are possible, but the students must discuss this with the instructor. Prerequisites: None.

  • John Kirk | FA2010 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2135.01
  • John Kirk | FA2012 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2135.01
  • John Kirk | FA2013 | T, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2135.01
  • John Kirk | FA2011 | TF, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2135.01

Women Composers

This class will explore music by women composers, with a special emphasis on composers from the 20th and 21rst centuries. We will become acquainted with music by Hildegard von Bingen, Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Clara Schumann, Germaine Tailleferre, Amy Beach, Lili and Nadia Boulanger, Rebecca Clarke, Ruth Crawford, Galina Ustvolskaya, Sofia Gubaidulina, Mary Lou Wiliams, Vivian Fine, Betsy Jolas, Ellen Taffe Zwillich, Joan Tower and Kaija Saariaho, among others. After a few introductory lectures, the course will consist primarily of student presentations. Each student will be assigned a composer to present to the class. There will be weekly listening assignments and selected readings, and students will be expected to keep a journal of notes on classes and homework. Prerequisites: None.

  • Allen Shawn | SP2012 | MTh, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MHI2110.01

Music Instrumental Study

Banjo

Beginning, intermediate, or advanced group lessons on the 5-string banjo in the claw-hammer/frailing style. Student will learn to play using simple song sheets with chords, tablature, and standard notation. Using chord theory and scale work, personal music-making skills will be enhanced. Awareness of traditional styles of playing the instrument will be furthered through a listening component and ensemble playing with other instrumentalists. Prerequisites: Student must have own instrument (5-string banjo).

  • John Kirk | FA2010 | T, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2215.01
  • John Kirk | FA2012 | T, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2215.01
  • John Kirk | FA2013 | T, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2215.01
  • John Kirk | SP2011 | T, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2215.01
  • John Kirk | SP2012 | T, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2215.01
  • John Kirk | SP2013 | T, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2215.01
  • John Kirk | SP2014 | T, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2215.01
  • John Kirk | FA2011 | TF, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2215.01

Bass and Electric Bass

Beginning to advanced lessons in bass technique and appropriate theory. Prerequisites: Audition. Contact Suzanne Jones, x 4510, for details. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • Michael Bisio | SP2013 | , - | MIN2217.01
  • Michael Bisio | FA2010 | , - | MIN4217.01
  • Michael Bisio | FA2011 | , - | MIN4217.01
  • Michael Bisio | FA2012 | , - | MIN4217.01
  • Michael Bisio | SP2011 | , - | MIN4217.01
  • Michael Bisio | SP2012 | , - | MIN4217.01

Bass with Bisio

Beginning to advanced lessons in bass technique and appropriate theory. Prerequisites: Audition. Contact Suzanne Jones, x4510, for details. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8:00 pm).

  • Michael Bisio | FA2013 | , - | MIN4417.01
  • Michael Bisio | SP2014 | , - | MIN4417.01

Beginning Cello

The basics of cello. In a small group, students will learn how to play the instrument of their choice, with an emphasis on a group performance at the term's conclusion. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Must attend and participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • Nathaniel Parke | FA2010 | Th, 9:00AM-10:00AM | MIN2354.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | FA2011 | Th, 9:00AM-10:00AM | MIN2354.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | FA2012 | Th, 9:00AM-10:00AM | MIN2354.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | SP2013 | Th, 9:00AM-10:00AM | MIN2354.01

Beginning Cello II

The basics of cello, part two. In a small group, students will learn how to play the instrument of their choice, with an emphasis on a group performance at the term's conclusion. Prerequisites: MIN2354 Beginning Cello or permission of the instructor.

  • Nathaniel Parke | FA2013 | Th, 9:00AM-10:00AM | MIN4354.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | SP2011 | Th, 9:00AM-10:00AM | MIN4354.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | SP2012 | Th, 9:00AM-10:00AM | MIN4354.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | SP2014 | Th, 9:00AM-10:00AM | MIN4354.01

Beginning Guitar

Introduces the fundamentals of acoustic guitar playing, including hand positions, tuning, reading music, major and pentatonic scales, major, minor, and seventh chords, chord progressions, blues progressions, and simple arrangements of songs. Prerequisites: Any form of previous musical experience: (e.g. singing in a chorus, studying an instrument, having taken a music course). Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • Hui Cox | FA2013 | , - | MIN2247.01
  • Frederic Hand | FA2010 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MIN2247.01
  • Frederic Hand | FA2011 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MIN2247.01
  • Frederic Hand | FA2012 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MIN2247.01
  • Frederic Hand | SP2011 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MIN2247.01
  • Frederic Hand | SP2012 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MIN2247.01
  • Frederic Hand | SP2013 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MIN2247.01
  • Hui Cox | SP2014 | F, 10:10AM-12:00PM | MIN2247.01

Beginning Violin and Viola

Basic techniques to include the reading of music in treble and/or alto clefs and in various "easy" keys. The study of left-hand position and fingering and the simple use of the bow will lead to short ensemble performances by the end of the term. Prerequisites: Student must arrange for the use of a college instrument, if needed (contact Music Coordinator, ext. #4519)

  • Kaori Washiyama | FA2012 | , - | MIN2241.01
  • Kaori Washiyama | SP2012 | , - | MIN2241.01
  • Kaori Washiyama | FA2010 | F, 11:00AM-12:00PM | MIN2241.01
  • Kaori Washiyama | FA2013 | F, 11:00AM-12:00PM | MIN2241.01
  • Kaori Washiyama | SP2014 | F, 11:00AM-12:00PM | MIN2241.01
  • Kaori Washiyama | SP2013 | Sa, 10:15AM-11:15AM | MIN2241.01
  • Kaori Washiyama | FA2011 | W, 2:00PM- 3:00PM | MIN2241.01

Beginning Violin and Viola II

Basic techniques will include the reading of music in alto and/or treble clefs in the major keys of C, G, D, and A, and minor keys of a, d, e, and g. Hand positions and appropriate fingerings will be shown, and a rudimentary facility with the bow will be developed in order that all students may participate in simple ensemble performances by the end of the term. Using the practice of yoga as a guide, we will consider proper posture and physical concerns of playing. Prerequisites: MIN2241 Beginning Violin and Viola, or permission of the instructor.

  • Kaori Washiyama | SP2011 | , - | MIN4141.01

Brass Instruments

Individual instruction for brass players (including trumpet, French horn, trombone, and tuba). Strategies will be developed for each student to enhance their technique and musicianship. Course work will include the study and practice of music in a variety of styles including baroque, classical/romantic, contemporary, and jazz/improvisation, depending on the level and specific interests of the student. The physical and technical aspects of brass playing will be developed through the regular practice of various exercises. At least one public performance is required each term. Prerequisites: Audition times will be posted. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • Jonathan Myers | FA2010 | , - | MIN4218.01
  • Jonathan Myers | FA2011 | , - | MIN4218.01
  • Jonathan Myers | SP2011 | , - | MIN4218.01
  • Jonathan Myers | SP2012 | , - | MIN4218.01
  • Nathan Botts | FA2012 | , - | MIN4218.01
  • Nathan Botts | FA2013 | , - | MIN4218.01
  • Nathan Botts | SP2013 | , - | MIN4218.01
  • Nathan Botts | SP2014 | , - | MIN4218.01

Brass/Trumpet

A review of performance basics and trumpet playing, technique, and style using the Arban method. More advanced work will use the Charlier etudes. Various concerti and solo trumpet works will also be explored. Prerequisites: Audition. Contact Suzanne Jones, x4510, for details. Corequisites: Must attend and participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8:00 pm) in order to receive two credits.

  • Thomas Bergeron | FA2010 | , - | MIN4221.01
  • Thomas Bergeron | SP2011 | , - | MIN4221.01

Cello

Studio instruction in cello. There will be an emphasis on creating and working towards an end-of-term project for each student. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Audition times will be posted. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • Nathaniel Parke | FA2010 | , - | MIN4355.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | FA2011 | , - | MIN4355.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | FA2012 | , - | MIN4355.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | FA2013 | , - | MIN4355.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | SP2011 | , - | MIN4355.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | SP2012 | , - | MIN4355.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | SP2013 | , - | MIN4355.01
  • Nathaniel Parke | SP2014 | , - | MIN4355.01

Clarinet

Study of clarinet technique and repertoire with an emphasis on tone production, dexterity, reading skills, and improvisation. This course is for intermediate-advanced students only. Prerequisites: Audition times will be posted. Corequisites: Students will be requested to show work during the term at Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8 pm).

  • Bruce Williamson | FA2010 | , - | MIN4223.01
  • Bruce Williamson | FA2011 | , - | MIN4223.01
  • Bruce Williamson | FA2012 | , - | MIN4223.01
  • Bruce Williamson | FA2013 | , - | MIN4223.01
  • Bruce Williamson | SP2011 | , - | MIN4223.01
  • Bruce Williamson | SP2012 | , - | MIN4223.01
  • Bruce Williamson | SP2013 | , - | MIN4223.01
  • Bruce Williamson | SP2014 | , - | MIN4223.01

Classical Guitar

Individual training is available in classical guitar technique and repertoire, song accompaniment (finger style), improvisation, and arranging and composing for the guitar. Course material is tailored to the interests and level of the individual student. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Audition times will be posted. Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • Frederic Hand | FA2010 | , - | MIN4225.01
  • Frederic Hand | FA2011 | , - | MIN4225.01
  • Frederic Hand | FA2012 | , - | MIN4225.01
  • Frederic Hand | SP2011 | , - | MIN4225.01
  • Frederic Hand | SP2012 | , - | MIN4225.01
  • Frederic Hand | SP2013 | , - | MIN4225.01

Drumming: An Extension of Language

This course serves as an introduction to learning rhythms, chants and songs from Africa, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, and the African Diaspora. Using percussion instruments such as, congas, surdos, pandeiro, djembe, dunumba, doumbek and chekere; students will experience basic hand and stick techniques as well as learn to recognize drumming patterns associated with these traditional rhythms. Rhythms such as, Lamban, KuKu, Zaouli, Samba, Batucada, Yanvalu, Banda, Rhumba, and Guaguanco will be explored. The lab portion of the class examines these rhythms by discussing the language, dance, current events, mystic and religious beliefs of the people associated with these rhythms. Prerequisites: None.

  • Michael Wimberly | FA2012 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MIN2120.01
  • Michael Wimberly | FA2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MIN2120.01
  • Michael Wimberly | SP2013 | W, 2:10PM- 4:00PM | MIN2120.01

Fiddle

For the experienced (2+years of playing) violinist. Lessons in traditional styles of fiddling - Quebecois, New England, Southern Appalachian, Cajun, Irish, and Scottish. This tutorial is designed to heighten awareness of the variety of ways the violin is played regionally and socially in North America (and indeed around the world these days) and to give practical music skills for furthering personal music making. Students will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo. Prerequisites: 2+ years of violin instruction. Must have your own instrument or arrange for instrument use per term. Permission of the instructor. Corequisites: Must perform in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 - 8pm).

  • John Kirk | FA2010 | , - | MIN2227.01
  • John Kirk | SP2011 | T, 3:00PM- 4:00PM | MIN2227.01
  • John Kirk | SP2012 | T, 3:00PM- 4:00PM | MIN2227.01
  • John Kirk | SP2014 | T, 3:00PM- 4:00PM | MIN2227.01
  • John Kirk | FA2012 | T, 3:00PM- 4:00PM | MIN4327.01
  • John Kirk | FA2013 | T, 3:00PM- 4:00PM | MIN4327.01
  • John Kirk | SP2013 | T, 3:00PM- 4:00PM | MIN4327.01
  • John Kirk | FA2011 | TF, 3:00PM- 4:00PM | MIN4327.01