Fennis Brown '11

“In 100 Drawings, we had to make a drawing for every day of the term. It ingrained this drawing practice in me, and I've really responded to that.”

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Field Work Term

American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

St. Hieronymus Press, Berkeley, CA

Creative Growth Gallery, The Present Group, Oakland, CA

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Course Sampler

“As an artist, you need to stay inspired, and for me that means being able to read books and take classes in areas other than visual arts.”

  • Histories of Food: Early Modern to Postmodern, with Gregory Stroud
  • Morning Moves and Movement Practice: Ballet, with Peggy Florin
  • Willa Cather and Katherine Anne Porter, with Doug Bauer
  • Slip Casting Ceramics for Mixed Media Projects, with Yoko Inoue

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“I really enjoy the time and thinking that goes into the whole process of printmaking. This year I did a project based in portraiture, because it’s something I’d always shied away from. I worked with photos of people, layering the faces with color blocks; I silk-screened faces on acetate and built boxes out of them; I printed drawings I had made of the photos that were more literal and realistic. I was trying to break down the perception of what a portrait is and what a face means.

“This term I also took 100 Drawings. We had to make a drawing for every day of the term. It ingrained this drawing practice in me, and I’ve really responded to that. Because printmaking is so much about the process, I don’t get something physical out of it every time I go into the studio. With drawing, it was a really good feeling to know I could sit down for a few hours and create a finished product.

“I also find ways to do work related to arts administration and museum studies: I’m the student gallery manager for Usdan Gallery, I work at Vermont Arts Exchange, I’ve worked on SILO, the campus literary and arts journal, and I helped run a student gallery space called Dive Bar.

“As an artist, you need to stay inspired, and for me that means being able to read books and take classes in areas other than visual arts. In my first year at Bennington, I talked a lot with my advisor, [photographer] Liz Deschenes, about why I chose to come here instead of an art school. One reason was the liberal arts education: the importance of taking classes outside of art, including literature or science, so I can find new sources to inspire what I’m doing. In almost every class, I’ve been able to find things that relate to art, and I think that’s such a key thing to have.”