Seojeong Shin

Image of Seojong Shin
Visiting Faculty

Seojeong Shin teaches the history of Asian art and Chinese landscape paintings and prints. She is especially interested in how literati culture became more accessible during the premodern and early modern period of Asia.

Biography

Shin received her MA in art history from Seoul National University, South Korea, and her Ph. D in art history from the University of Maryland, College Park. In her doctoral dissertation, “Illustrations of Taiping Prefecture (1648): A Printed Album of Landscapes by the Seventeenth-Century Literati Artist Xiao Yuncong (1596-1673),” she investigated how during the seventeenth century literati art became accessible to the common people in China through the work of a scholar painter. 

Her research interests lie in Chinese paintings and prints during the Ming and Qing Dynasties, colonial and post-colonial period Korean ink paintings, contemporary Korean art in global age, and Japanese ink paintings and prints during the nineteenth century and the twentieth century. She is especially interested in how literati culture became more accessible during the premodern and early modern period of Asia and how art reflects the cross-cultural exchange among East Asian countries and the cultural hybridity of East and West. Currently, Shin is working as a consultant in researching and evaluating the Japanese paintings in the Walter and Dörte Simmons Collection in the preparation of the exhibition and the catalogue scheduled in 2021 at the Brauer Museum of Art, Valparaiso University. She curated the exhibition “Mark Fletcher: Winking Turtle, Whispering Tree,” and she is also preparing a future exhibition on the cultural identity of Korean American artists. She contributed to exhibition catalogues including The Floating World of Ukiyo-e: Shadows, Dreams, and Substance (2001), Moon Has No Home: Japanese Woodblock Prints from the University of Virginia (2003), Marginalized Histories of Korean Women (2019), and Spectral Speculation, Ruth A. Ruege Collection of Japanese Prints in the Collection of the Brauer Museum of Art, Valparaiso University (2020).

Shin has taught Asian art history courses, including Arts of Asia, Arts of East Asia, Arts of India and Southeast Asia, Buddhist Arts of Asia, Chinese Landscape Paintings, and Arts of Korea at American University, George Mason University, University of Maryland, College Park, Loyola University Maryland, and Northern Virginia Community College. She is a visiting faculty member at Bennington for Spring 2020.

Courses