Preserving a Historic Literary Landscape

Preserving a Historic Literary Landscape

Robert Frost came to Shaftsbury, Vermont to become an apple farmer, writing that he wished to start “a new Garden of Eden, with a thousand apple trees of some unforbidden variety.” There were Snow, Northern Spy, Golden Delicious, Red Delicious, McIntosh, and Red Astrachan apples on the property. You can read more about the history of apples on the farm here.

Early in his career, Frost wrote for poultry magazines, and had a habit of buying farms. You can learn about his storied history with farming and New England in New Yorker poetry critic Dan Chiasson’s article “Bet the Farm.”

One of the most exciting aspects of the Stone House is the preservation of a Vermont landscape that inspired some of America’s best known poetry.  We are continuing to propagate apple trees from original stock while we can, and preserve historic trees, stone walls, and barns on the grounds. The property has sustained wind damage in recent years, and the trees and barn are aging.

We have several opportunities to support this critical work. If you wish to contribute to the replanting of a line of birches by the stone wall, or purchase a memorial plaque for one of the apple trees in honor of a loved one, please reach out to Director Megan Mayhew-Bergman, or see our membership page for donation opportunities.